LibGuides – Made Just For You

Have you ever had students say they forgot their assignment at home or they didn’t know how to access our school resources? Do you have any upcoming projects that utilize a variety of print, database or online resources?

If you can answer yes to either of these questions, you’re going to love what a LibGuide can do for you and your students!  

Students will like LibGuides because the link, posted on our website, allows them access to their project resources anytime, anywhere.

Teachers will like LibGuides because of its versatility. You decide how to organize your content. For example, when creating the Macbeth LibGuide, the English IV teachers developed tabs (complete with database links) specifically tailored to their four informative essay prompts.

Macbeth

The Lakes Social Studies teachers took a different approach when creating their Civic Action Project LibGuide. They provided Google links along with tabs for making a Weebly website and public service announcement.

Andy Ehrhardt decided to use the LibGuide format for his Manifest Destiny LibGuide project, “because I wanted my students to get a glimpse of how to do research in a higher order context than their typical use of ‘just Google it.’” Andy used his LibGuide as an instructional tool for students to access the assignment, online catalog, e-book, database and work cited resources as they completed their group projects.

As Andy reflected back on his research project, “I think the LibGuide is a great method for students to be able to delve into a particular topic and learn some of the complexities of the material that might not be provided in a traditional textbook. I also believe it is a very useful tool to teach students how to do this type of research while still at the high school level because, hopefully, many will be able to apply some of these strategies further down the road while pursuing higher education in any field, not just social studies. I definitely will try to use this method of instruction again in the future, and look forward to building it into the curriculum for many years to come.”

As you can see, we can create guides on virtually any topic, subject, course or process. For more ideas, check out our LibGuide home page. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised at what you find. Then, when you’re ready to create your LibGuide, contact Barb Mason (barbara.mason@chsd117.org) or Kellie Doyle (kellie.doyle@chsd117.org).

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