5 steps for deciding if a website is the right one for your students’ research

Truth: You love Google. Your students love Google. It’s often our first stop in the research process, and there’s nothing wrong with that—as long as you’re choosing the right Websites as sources.

Not all Websites are current, accurate, and relevant, and not all of the best content conveniently floats to the top of your search (read this article about Google’s algorithms, for example). Finding the right Websites to cite in research is a process in and of itself. That’s why Barb and I put together this five-step infographic to help your students navigate through the good and the bad on the Web. Consider making it a poster for your classroom! Continue reading

Teaching research matters!

I remember going to the Learning Center when I was in elementary, middle, and high school. I remember the librarians teaching us how to use the card catalog and how to use the index in the back of a book. I remember a sixth grade social studies project, when I had to research Australia and put together a flipbook about the continent, complete with pictures and my original writing. You probably have similar memories from your school days.

Today is different.

I’m reading this book right now for a librarian class called Reference and Instructional Services for Information Literacy Skills in School Libraries. Chapter One quotes Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google, as saying, “[these days] we create as much information every two days as was created from the beginning of human history to 2003.” That’s a lot of stuff, and our students need to receive instruction on how to effectively navigate through it all in school and in life.  Continue reading